BEGINNING OF THE JOURNEY

BEGINNING OF THE JOURNEY

As a child living in England, Jane was given a life-like stuffed chimpanzee toy named Jubilee by her father. Her love for the toy sparked her early joy for animals. Jane’s love of animals was always apparent to everyone around her. When she was 10 she had decided that she wanted a life with animals. However in the 1950’s, it was not an easy path to be a girl with a dream to explore, travel and be a scientist. Luckily Jane was determined and worked as a waitress until she had saved enough money for a ticket and off she went to explore the jungles of Africa.

As a child living in England, Jane was given a life-like stuffed chimpanzee toy named Jubilee by her father. Her love for the toy sparked her early joy for animals. Jane’s love of animals was always apparent to everyone around her. When she was 10 she had decided that she wanted a life with animals. However in the 1950’s, it was not an easy path to be a girl with a dream to explore, travel and be a scientist. Luckily Jane was determined and worked as a waitress until she had saved enough money for a ticket and off she went to explore the jungles of Africa.

JANE IN AFRICA

Jane Goodall finally made it to Africa and met anthropologist Louis Leakey who would later become her mentor and teacher. Leakey thought understanding primates would shed light onto understanding human behavior and believe Jane was the right person to undertake this mission. Jane first set foot in what is now known as Gombe Stream National Park in 1960, when she launched her pioneering research with wild chimpanzees. She was only 26 years old when she made this landmark discovery – equipped with little more than a notebook, binoculars, optimism and desire to learn more about these incredible animals. Her research project was unlike any other. Through patience and persistence, she won the trust of the chimpanzees. Then she started to observe a wild chimpanzee, which she named David Greybeard, carefully modifying plant material in order to use it as a tool to fish for termites. At that time tool-related behaviour was not considered to be a habitual trait in wild animals. The public was fascinated by her findings. Dr. Jane Goodall’s research ultimately helped to change the way we understand chimpanzees, other animals, our role in caring for the planet we all share and the way that we look at evolution and ourselves forever. In 1962 Leakey supported Jane in applying for the PhD program at Cambridge University so that could continue her discoveries in an academic environment. In 1965, Jane became the 8th person in the world who achieved a doctoral degree without a bachelor’s degree.

Dr. Jane Goodall & David Greybeard. Photo by, Hugo Van Lawick.

JANE IN AFRICA

Jane Goodall finally made it to Africa and met anthropologist Louis Leakey who would later become her mentor and teacher. Leakey thought understanding primates would shed light onto understanding human behavior and believe Jane was the right person to undertake this mission. Jane first set foot in what is now known as Gombe Stream National Park in 1960, when she launched her pioneering research with wild chimpanzees. She was only 26 years old when she made this landmark discovery – equipped with little more than a notebook, binoculars, optimism and desire to learn more about these incredible animals. Her research project was unlike any other. Through patience and persistence, she won the trust of the chimpanzees. Then she started to observe a wild chimpanzee, which she named David Greybeard, carefully modifying plant material in order to use it as a tool to fish for termites. At that time tool-related behaviour was not considered to be a habitual trait in wild animals. The public was fascinated by her findings. Dr. Jane Goodall’s research ultimately helped to change the way we understand chimpanzees, other animals, our role in caring for the planet we all share and the way that we look at evolution and ourselves forever. In 1962 Leakey supported Jane in applying for the PhD program at Cambridge University so that could continue her discoveries in an academic environment. In 1965, Jane became the 8th person in the world who achieved a doctoral degree without a bachelor’s degree.

Dr. Jane Goodall & David Greybeard. Photo by, Hugo Van Lawick.

I went as a scientist, I left as an activist.

Dr. Jane Goodall

ESTABLISHMENT OF THE INSTITUTE

Dr. Goodall, known as a groundbreaking scientist in the world, said that she had one of the most important breakthroughs of her life at a conference in Chicago. She later stated that she went there as a scientist and left as an activist. Later on in 1977, Jane founded the Jane Goodall Institute, which continues to support the research at Gombe. With 31 offices around the world, Dr. Jane and the Institute are widely recognized for effective community-centered conservation and development programs in Africa and the protection of wild chimpanzees in Africa’s largest chimpanzee sanctuary. In 1991, after meeting with a group of Tanzanian teenagers to discuss community problems, Jane created Roots & Shoots. For her Roots & Shoots program Jane Goodall was named UN Messenger of Peace by the United Nations.

Today, Dr Jane Goodall’s work revolves around inspiring action on behalf of endangered species and encouraging people to do their part to make the world a better place for environment, animals and people. She continues her work by speaking about the threats facing chimpanzees, other environmental crises, and her reasons for hope that we will ultimately solve the problems that we have imposed on the earth. Everywhere she goes, Jane urges audiences to recognize their personal power and responsibility to effect positive change through consumer action, lifestyle change and activism.

Dr. Jane Goodall is now known around the world as a Dame, UN Messenger of Peace, conservationist, primatologist, ethologist, anthropologist and the world’s foremost expert on chimpanzees but she remains at heart a young girl with a dream. Today, Jubilee still sits on her dresser in London as a reminder of her desire to explore the unknown.

ESTABLISHMENT OF THE INSTITUTE

Dr. Goodall, known as a groundbreaking scientist in the world, said that she had one of the most important breakthroughs of her life at a conference in Chicago. She later stated that she went there as a scientist and left as an activist. Later on in 1977, Jane founded the Jane Goodall Institute, which continues to support the research at Gombe. With 31 offices around the world, Dr. Jane and the Institute are widely recognized for effective community-centered conservation and development programs in Africa and the protection of wild chimpanzees in Africa’s largest chimpanzee sanctuary. In 1991, after meeting with a group of Tanzanian teenagers to discuss community problems, Jane created Roots & Shoots. For her Roots & Shoots program Jane Goodall was named UN Messenger of Peace by the United Nations.

Today, Dr Jane Goodall’s work revolves around inspiring action on behalf of endangered species and encouraging people to do their part to make the world a better place for environment, animals and people. She continues her work by speaking about the threats facing chimpanzees, other environmental crises, and her reasons for hope that we will ultimately solve the problems that we have imposed on the earth. Everywhere she goes, Jane urges audiences to recognize their personal power and responsibility to effect positive change through consumer action, lifestyle change and activism.

Dr. Jane Goodall is now known around the world as a Dame, UN Messenger of Peace, conservationist, primatologist, ethologist, anthropologist and the world’s foremost expert on chimpanzees but she remains at heart a young girl with a dream. Today, Jubilee still sits on her dresser in London as a reminder of her desire to explore the unknown.

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